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Steady Boy Records Artists
Freddie Steady Krc | Will Callery | Uranium Savages | Shakin' Apostles | Doug Sahm | Emily Grace Berry | Larry Lange | Chase Hamblin | Al Staehely | The Downliners Sect | Jimmy Silva | Phil Lee | Jenny Wolfe | Rick Broussard | Mitch Jacobs | Freddie Krc | Pamela Richardson | Roky Erickson & The Explosives | The Explosives | Vince Bell



Fredie Steady KRC

Freddie Steady KRC

He's in the Texas Music Hall of Fame and just this year he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Academy of Texas Music. He's steered his own groups The Explosives, Freddie Steady's Wild Country, the Shakin' Apostles and the Freddie Steady 5 over vastly different musical terrains. He's toured the globe and recorded with world-renowned artists such as Roger Waters of Pink Floyd, Carole King, Roky Erickson, Jerry Jeff Walker and Ronnie Lane, just to name a few. He's released a couple dozen records in his various incarnations. We think it's high time that Freddie Steady Krc finally release his first true solo album. Well, second actually, but that first one was only released in the former Czechoslovakia, but that's yet another fascinating story in the life of this Renaissance Texan.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Will Callery

Will Callery

“Hands on the Wheel” has always been the spiritual centerpiece of Willie Nelsonís masterpiece, Red Headed Stranger. Willie wrote most of that sparse storytelling album on his own, but “Hands on the Wheel” was written by another gifted songwriter, Will Callery.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Uranium Savages

Uranium Savages

It’s been more than thirty years since the last Uranium Savages album, and SteadyBoy Records is thrilled to have these musical savages in the fold. This loose affiliation of musical hooligans is a slice of Weird Al, a dash Spinal Tap (gone country), a serving of Spike Jones, and a heaping helping of Austin weirdness, keeping it that way since well before Keeping Austin Weird became a thing.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Larry Lange

Shakin' Apostles

It was a gloriously jangly power pop with a western twist that defined the mighty Shakin’ Apostles of Austin, Texas in the 1990s. They were musical descendants of Austin music Hall of Famer Freddie Steady Krc’s previous band, The Explosives, a tight rocking trio of the prior decade. But as much as Krc (rhymes with search) loved those tight-as-a-drum three-minute rockers, he was equally influenced by the folk rock of Buffalo Springfield, the Byrds, and Moby Grape. The Apostles would be his outlet for a decidedly more western sound.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Larry Lange

Doug Sahm

Douglas Wayne Sahm first burst onto the rock and roll scene in the early sixties with a glorious gumbo of Cajun, Tejano, country, blues, western swing, Southern folk, and the best of British Invasion rock and roll. Doug took his Tex Mex mix into music history, fronting the Sir Douglas Quintet, recording with Bob Dylan, jamming with the Dead, and creating the Texas Tornados. Doug’s been musically important ever since he played on stage- -at age eleven--with Hank Williams.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Larry Lange

Emily Grace Berry

Emily Grace Berry grew up listening to Texas singer/songwriters, and now she is one. It didn’t take much time; she’s singing full time now at twenty. Growing up on a Texas ranch is a good way to find country music, and being a kid anywhere is an easy way to find contemporary pop. But her music-loving parents wanted her tastes to transcend genre, so they turned her on to category-defiers like Linda Ronstadt, Gram Parsons, Emmylou Harris, the Dixie Chicks, and their own Texas favorite, Jerry Jeff Walker.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Larry Lange

Larry Lange & His Lonely Knights

Larry Lange’s Wiggle Room remembers the times and the places of the music that changed his life. It was the sixties, the seventies, Louisiana, San Antonio, the sounds from the Gulf Coast, when regional hits were just that: sounds reflective of the communities that gave them life. Lange loved the swamp pop, Tejano rock, and southern blues so much that he became a lifelong bass-playing musician. These days, his bass is out front in Larry Lange and His Lonely Knights, a glorious gumbo of sounds that fill his soul.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Chase Hamblin

Chase Hamblin

Infectious pop songs, lavish Beatlesque production, psychedelic
imagery, and a sweet, soaring voice to pull them all together. Rufus
Wainwright? Jeff Buckley? Beck? Houston’s Chase Hamblin
brings the passion of Buckley and Beck along with the lush sound
and impressionistic imagery of Wainwright, but he’s also as jangly
and hip as the Small Faces grooving in Itchycoo Park. Put another
way, he rocks. “We’re Gonna Make It” is a rock and roll nugget of
pure radio-friendly sunshine; “Never Let You Go” an urgent blast
of power pop; “Bye Bye” a swirling Sgt. Pepper tour de force.
The sixties are alive and well in Hamblin’s indie pop world, but so
is the Texas singer/songwriter music tradition. Chase Hamblin: remember
the name, remember the sound, remember the songs. It’s
all too beautiful.

1-Sheet (pdf)



Al Staehely

Al Staehely

Straight out of rock and roll history comes the rare and classic solo
album from former Spirit frontman, Al Staehely. Originally released
as Stahaley’s Comet (a deliberate misspelling of Al’s true
last name, in order to represent the pronunciation phonetically),
this is the 1982 album’s first appearance on CD and its first appearance
on this side of the pond. 10K Hrs. is the first step in Al’s
long-awaited and rockin’ return to stage and studio—and it won’t
be the last.
Staehely’s gift for writing, playing, and singing tough rockers secured
him the high-profile gig that kept the legendary progressive
rock band Spirit alive after the departure of several founding members
in 1971. Al and his brother John brought a new blues rock feel
from their native Texas, proving with the acclaimed Feedback album
that Spirit endured. Tight tracks like “Cadillac Cowboys” and
“Chelsea Girls” displayed Al’s songwriting talents, which led to
covers by artists like Bobbie Gentry and Keith Moon. But it was
Al’s own interpretations that rang truest, as you’ll hear in this landmark
album. 10K Hrs. has muscle, energy, and rock and roll passion.
Not to mention spirit.

1-Sheet (pdf)



The Downliners Sect

The Downliners Sect

The Downliners Sect were the ragged, rocking real deal, blasting
out of England in 1964 on an early British wave that took their
contemporaries the Rolling Stones, the Yardbirds, the Kinks, and
the Pretty Things to rock and roll heights and history. But unlike
their friends, the Sect stayed true to their rhythm and blues roots
and the grungy glory of the two and a half minute record. Cool
tracks like "Baby What's Wrong" and "Little Egypt" gave them
stardom in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway and an enduring cult
status everywhere else. Half a century later, they're still true to
those roots and still fronted by founding members Don Craine and
Keith Grant. The Sect survives, and SteadyBoy is thrilled to bring
this album of tracks that only saw limited release in the nineties.

Dangerous Ground presents the band true to the spirit of American
blues-based rock and roll with a British twist, sounding like early
Rolling Stones, had they never abandoned the raw sound of their
first several albums. Speaking of the Stones, Ronnie Wood’s brother
Art Wood painted the inspired Dangerous Ground cover.
Blues rock gets no more authentic, no more psychedelic, no more
unrepentant than the Downliners Sect.

1-Sheet (pdf)


Jimmy Silva

Jimmy Silva

The three alluring albums cut by San Francisco bay area native Jimmy Silva 20 years ago, full of irresistible folk-rockers and haunting melodies, have never been forgotten by Silva's fellow musicians and his adoring core of fans. Critic’s darlings the Young Fresh Fellows and the Smithereens recorded some of Silva’s best work.

In turn, YFF’s Scott McCaughey contributed songs to Silva’s solo recordings before Silva’s untimely death at 42 in 1994. McCaughey went on to work with REM and to form the Minus 5, but he never forgot his friend’s songs. Neither did SteadyBoy Records owner and Texas power popper, Freddie Steady Krc, and music journalist Jud Cost who gathered Silva’s fans and friends for Through a Faraway Window: A Tribute to Jimmy Silva. The collection includes Freddie Steady, Scott McCaughey, the Beau Brummels' Sal Valentino, the Posies’ Jon Auer, and other Silva admirers. Look through this faraway window, and you’ll hear the inspirational songs Jimmy left behind.

1-Sheet (pdf)


Phil Lee

Phil Lee

With thirty years of road work and songwriting, Nashville singer songwriter Phil Lee is the real deal. You can hear it in his rough-edged voice, and in the vivid imagery that his lyrics present, with stories of worker-bee illegals, truck-driving killers, rats, weasels, and humans with rodent-like qualities. Lee’s is a world of people on the literal and figurative outskirts, straight out of Springsteen’s Nebraska, just a little further south and with a sense of humor. And there’s always that burning desire to rock to a country beat. They are songs without judgment: Phil isn’t throwing stones, but he is a master knife-thrower (seriously), so don’t cross him. His songs hit their target on first listen. The new album is named after a Woody Guthrie classic updated on the record with the Phil Lee touch, So Long It’s Been Good to Know You. Get to know him before he gets away.

PhilLee1.com | Myspace | 1-Sheet (pdf)


Jenny Wolfe

Jenny Wolfe

Jenny Wolfe was just thirteen when her first album, Jenny Wolfe and the Pack, was recorded, and her voice was mature and stunning then. Now she’s older, wiser, and ready to rock, with her solo album, After School. Jenny’s amazing voice already packed a punch, now it knocks you out. With a rock and roll heart and an uncanny ability to make classic songs her own, Jenny shines on “Dancing in the Streets,” “Baby It’s You,” and “I Want You Back.” But she’s also nailing producer Freddie Steady Krc’s undiscovered power pop gems, along with two tracks that she wrote with Krc (the title track and “Twisted Smile”).

Myspace | Pack 1-sheet (pdf) | After School 1-sheet (pdf)

 


Rick Broussard

Rick Broussard

Slapping the rockabilly tag on Rick Broussard is kind of like pigeon-holing The Clash into punk rock. At the end of the day for either one, they make music that rocks. Period. Even Broussard’s sad songs and weepers carry a rhythmic groove that would make Joe Strummer proud. Broussard can’t help it, after a lifetime of listening to British rock and Texas country and a few decades of banging out a righteous country rocking beat in honky tonks. Every night on stage, then and now, Rick usually finds himself airborne with his trademark onstage leaps--because he can’t help that either. The San Antonio native calls Austin home now, though he and his Two Hoots and a Holler still cover the map with their rockabilly punk, Cajun country, and surfin’ hula honky tonk music. In fact, there’s even a song called “Surfin’ Hula Honky Tonk” on Let It Go, Broussard’s first release on the Austin-based SteadyBoy label, the brainchild of fellow Texas category-defying Freddie Steady Krc.

TwoHootsandaHoller.com | Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


Mitch Jacobs

Mitch Jacobs

From somewhere between Elvis’s flashy Vegas and Johnny Cash’s earthy Arkansas comes a country boy in a little old Texas town called Houston. That’s where rural folk music, showbiz pop, and American rock and roll reached Mitch Jacobs. Like any other kid growing up in the sixties and seventies, he listened to all kinds of music, and he played all kinds too, because Mitch spent some years in eighties cover bands. But he had a spiritual kinship with one particular artist, and he didn’t even realize that time, experience, and personal history would result in a respectfully similar singing style.

MitchJacobsBand.com | Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


Freddie Steady

Freddie Steady Krc

Texas Music Hall-of-Famer Freddie Steady Krc comes by his name honestly. This renaissance Texan has pounded out a steady beat on the drums around the world and across miles and miles of Texas for the past several decades. Krc (rhymes with search) landed in Austin at the precise moment that a musical revolution was getting started at a styles-don’t-matter joint called the Armadillo World Headquarters.

FreddieSteadyKrc.com | Myspace | 1-sheet bio (pdf)


Pamela Richardson

Pamela Richardson

Singer songwriter Pamela Richardson presents love songs in a resonant voice, expressing a fluid range. Of her CD Spaghetti Midwestern, Americana-UK.com wrote: “A genuine air of originality, thanks to Richardson’s beautiful alto vocals, ear for harmony and innovative arrangements".

Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


Roky Erickson & The Explosives

Roky Erickson & The Explosives

"Nobody had ever heard anything like Roky Erickson when he and his 13th Floor Elevators burst out of Austin, Texas onto the psychedelic scene in 1966 with their scary nugget, " You're Gonna Miss Me." A decade later, the power-popping Explosives re-ignited the Austin flame, infusing tight Beatlesque rhythms with the passionate fury of their Elevator hero.

Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


The Explosives

The Explosives

The Explosives lived up to their name in the late seventies and early eighties, packing more power than their so-called punk rock peers. That’s because they were not actually punk rockers themselves. Like Elvis Costello (saddled with the same inappropriate tag at the time), they played something that had been out of fashion for a while, music of rhythm with a jangly melody, something called “rock and roll.”

Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


Vince Bell

Vince Bell

"Legendary Texas Songwriter VINCE BELL: His songs have been performed and recorded by such diverse talents as Little Feat, Lyle Lovett and Nanci Griffith, and he has had a ballet set to his work. He has released five critically acclaimed CDs, and is the author of an autobiography, One Man's Music: The Life and Times of Texas Songwriter Vince Bell, chronicling his amazing comeback after a devastating car accident in 1982. Referring to Bell's fellow Texas songwriters (Townes Van Zandt, Guy Clark, Lyle Lovett and herself) Nanci Griffith said, 'From all of us who were beating the paths around Texas in the 70s, I always felt Vince was the best of us.' 'Vince is a poet,' said the late Townes Van Zandt. He is one of those rare artists who transcend category: its a little rock 'n' roll, a little folk, a little country, some blues and jazz, some singer-songwriter. What kind of music? Vince Bell music."

VinceBell.com | Myspace | 1-sheet (pdf)


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